Archive | Harvest Home RSS feed for this section

Witches’ Sabbats 2012 (Northern Hemisphere)

1 Dec

This information has been moved to the WordPress Page format (versus Post format) and can be found above my blog header and at http://faeriekat.wordpress.com/on-the-subject-of-witchcraft/witches-sabbats-2012/.

Witches’ Sabbats 2011 (Northern Hemisphere)

17 Dec

sabbatwheel

Date Name Celebration Other Names
FEB 2*

Alt Date:
When the first stirrings of spring are felt, or on the full moon that falls closest to this time.
Imbolc (in the belly) This is a Greater Sabbat and High Holiday.

It marks the first signs of life returning to the land; specifically, when the lambing begins (hence “in the belly”).

Just as the light is growing stronger, the young Sun God is growing stronger, too.

The Mother Goddess, no longer required to nurse the babe born at Yule, exchanges her robes for those of the Maiden Goddess.

As one of the four fire festivals, candles are lit to sweep away the winter darkness.

This is a traditional time for re-dedication and pledges for the coming year.
Oimelc (milk of ewes), Saint Brigid’s Day (also known as Brigit, Brighid, Bride, and Brid), Candlemas, La Fheill Brìghde (Scots), La Fheile Bríde (Irish), Gwyl y Canhwyllau (Welsh), Brigantia and Lupercalia (Lupercus was the God of shepherds in Roman mythology and was associated with goats and dogs; he was identified with Faunus, the equivalent of the Greek God Pan)
Date Name Celebration Other Names
MAR 20**
(Spring/ Vernal Equi­nox)

Alt Date:
The festival of the Goddess Eostar may be celebrated on the full moon closest to the Spring/Vernal Equinox.
Lady Day This is a Lesser Sabbat and Low Holiday.

It occurs when day and night are equal and light is on the ascendant.

The Maiden Goddess welcomes the embraces of the green and flourishing Sun God and conceives a child to be born in nine months time at the Winter Solstice (Yule).

In early agricultural societies, it was on this day that landowners and farmer tenants signed their year-long contracts before ploughing was to start.
Festival of Trees, Earrach (Celtic for Spring), Gwyl Ganol y Gwanwyn (Welsh) and Alban Eilir (Druidic).

Ostara and Eostre (from which the holiday Easter is derived), both of which are incorrectly applied to this equinox and quarter day, celebrate the festival of the Goddess Eostar whose symbols are the egg and the hare. If you wish to celebrate this Goddess, see Alt Date.
Date Name Celebration Other Names
MAY 1*

Alt Date:
As a result of the change from the Julian to the Gregorian calendar, Bealltainn came to be celebrated on May 15, while in Ireland Sean Bhealtain (“Old May”) began the night of May 11. This festival may also be celebrated on the full moon nearest the mid-point between the Spring Equinox and the Summer Solstice.
Beltane This is a Greater Sabbat and High Holiday.

It signals when the crops sown on Lady Day begin to sprout, the animals bear their young, and the people begin to get out of their houses. Activities center on fecundity and procreation, such as the maypole.

The marriage of the Maiden Goddess and the Sun God is formally conducted and celebrated, and the Maiden Goddess becomes the official Mother Goddess.

One of the four fire festivals, bonfires are lit.

This is also the first of the three festivals of the Faerie Realm, but occurs only every seven years, when the faeries fight amongst themselves for the best ears of grain in the upcoming harvest.
Beltaine, May Day, Walpurgis Night, La Bealtaine (Irish), Latha Bealltainn (Scots), and Gwyl Galan Mai (Welsh)
Date Name Celebration Other Names
JUN 21**
(Summer Solstice)

Alt Date:
None
Mid-Summer’s Eve This is a Lesser Sabbat and Low Holiday.

It is the longest day and shortest night of the year. From this time onwards, the days gradually grow shorter again.

The Sun God is at the peak of his power. The bounty of the earth ripens, as does the Mother Goddess with Her child conceived on Lady Day.

This is a time for rest and play, a respite between the planting and harvesting of the crops.

This is also the day when the Oak King is defeated by the Holly King and the Holly King begins his six-month reign.

This is the second of the three festivals of the Faerie Realm, when faeries ride forth singing and are at their gayest.
Litha (non-traditional name introduced by Aidan Kelly in the 1970s), Samradh (Celtic for Summer), Alban Hefin (Druidic), Aerra Litha (Saxon for the month of June), Gwyl Ganol yr Haf (Welsh), Sun Blessing, Gathering Day, and St. John’s Eve
Date Name Celebration Other Names
AUG 1*

Alt Date:
None
Lammas This is a Greater Sabbat and High Holiday.

This is the celebration of the first harvest.

Another of the four fire festivals, fire wheels were often rolled down hills to mark the declining of the Sun God’s power. Bonfires are also lit.

This is the first of the three harvest festivals, which incorporates the baking of a figure of the Sun God in bread, then symbolically sacrificing and eating it.

The Mother Goddess watches in both sorrow and joy as she realizes that the adult Sun God is dying, yet lives on inside Her as Her child.
Lughnassah, Lughnasadh, Lamastide, August Eve, First Harvest, Bread Harvest, Festival of First Fruits, and Gwyl Galan Awst (Welsh)
Date Name Celebration Other Names
SEP 23**
(Fall/Autumn Equinox)

Alt Date:
None
Harvest Home This is a Lesser Sabbat and Low Holiday.

Once again, the balance of day and night are equal with darkness on the ascendant.

This sabbat is a celebration and thanksgiving for the fruits of the earth in the second of the three harvest festivals. It is also a time of rest after hard work.

The blessings of the God and Goddess for the upcoming winter months are sought.

The Sun God dies, but his power is preserved in the spirit of the fields, trapped and crystallized in the plants and animals. He returns to the womb of the Mother Goddess and joins his spirit with that of his son.

The Mother Goddess now takes on the aspect of the Crone Goddess, the old and wise one who stands at the crossroads of life and death, all-seeing and all-knowing.
Mabon (coined by Aidan Kelly around 1970 as a reference to Mabon ap Modron, a character from Welsh mythology), Second Harvest, Fruit Harvest, Wine Harvest, Feast of the Ingathering, Mean Fomhair (Irish), Fogharadh (Celtic for Harvest), Alban Elfed (Druidic) and Gwyl Ganol yr Hydref (Welsh)
Date Name Celebration Other Names
OCT 31*

Alt Date:
When the sun has reached 15 degrees Scorpio
All Hallow’s Eve This is a Greater Sabbat and High Holiday.

It marks the beginning and end of the pagan year.

This is the beginning of the resting season, a time of remembrance of those who have gone before, and a time to pierce the veil between the worlds and divine what the coming year holds.

The Sun God waits to be reborn and the Crone Goddess stirs the cauldron of life, death and rebirth.

The last of the three harvest festivals is held, respect is paid to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets and other loved ones who have died, and the spirits of the departed are invited to attend the festivities.

One of the four fire festivals, bonfires are lit.

This is the last of the three festivals of the Faerie Realm when faeries interact with humans, but they are gloomy and dance with ghosts. It is also at this time that the Queen of the Faeries leads the Wild Hunt and escorts the souls of the year’s dead (and anyone living unlucky enough to encounter the Hunt) through the veil to the Shining Land (also known as the Summerland).
Samhain (“Summer’s End”), All Hallows, Hallow E’en, Halloween, Last Harvest, Blood Harvest, Ancestor Night, Feast of the Dead, and Nos Calan Gaeaf (Welsh)
Date Name Celebration Other Names***
DEC 22**
(Winter Solstice)

Alt Date:
None
Yule This is a Lesser Sabbat and Low Holiday.

This sabbat occurs on the longest night and shortest day, when the decreasing days give way to increasing light and life.

The Goddess Mother once again gives birth to the Sun God. As a newborn babe, he is the embodiment of innocence and joy, and represents the returning light.

This is also the day when the Holly King is defeated by the Oak King and the Oak King begins his six-month reign.

Some historians claim that the Yule celebration is connected to Odin’s Wild Hunt or was influenced by Saturnalia, the Roman winter festival.
Mid-Winter, Mid-Winter’s Eve, The Mother’s Night, Alban Arthan (Druidic), Geamhradh (Irish) and Winter Rite

*This date stays the same each year.
**This date varies each year.
***I removed “Cuidle” from this list because, after an exhaustive search, I could find neither its etymology nor even determine its language of origin.  A woman in Australia stated she celebrated this holiday on February 1st, it being the opposite of Samhaim; however, the sabbat opposite February in the Southern Hemisphere is Imbolc, not Samhain, and the proper sabbat for the Southern Hemisphere in February is Lammas with Samhain being held on May 1st.  Yule/Cuidle occurs in June in the Southern Hemisphere.

Greater Sabbats reflect the natural cycles of the earth, i.e., seasonal, earth-related changes that are not solar-related.  Note that these four sabbats correspond with the fire festivals, which brings earth/nature (Goddess) and sun/fire (God) together.  These sabbats mark monumental changes on the wheel of life and the natural energies on these dates are extremely high.

Lesser Sabbats, alternatively, are based on the the solstices and equinoxes, the exact dates of which can be determined astronomically.  While these sabbats are solar-related and what is happening to the God is of foremost importance, they are also periods of rest and surcease for the Goddess while her monumental efforts take root, flower and fruit so they may be reaped.  The natural energies on these dates may be slightly lower but are of equal quality to the Greater Sabbats.

It should be noted that magic/spells are not performed on sabbat holidays.  These days are holy days set aside to celebrate and honor the Goddess and God, and magic is only performed in dire need (such as emergency healing magic).

Witches’ Sabbats 2010 (Northern Hemisphere)

30 Sep

sabbatwheel

Date Name Sabbat Holiday Celebration Alt Names
FEB 2*

Alt:

When the first stirrings of spring are felt, or on the full moon that falls closest to this time.

Imbolc
(“in the
belly”)
Greater High This sabbat marks the first signs of life returning to the land.

Just as the light is grow-
ing stronger, the young Sun God has grown stronger, too.

The Goddess Mother, no longer required to nurse the babe, exchanges her robes for those of the Maiden Goddess.

As one of the four “fire festivals,” candles are lit to sweep away the winter darkness.

This is a traditional time for rededica-
tion and pledges for the coming year.

Oimelc (“milk of ewes”), St. Brigid’s Day (also known as Brigit, Brighid, Bride, and Brìd), Là Fhèill Brìghde (Scot-land), Lá Fhéile Bríde (Ireland), Gŵyl Fair (Wales), Brigantia, Candle-
mas and Luper-
calia (Lupercus was the God of shepherds in Roman myth-
ology and was associa-
ted with goats and dogs; he was identi-
fied with Faunus, the equiva-
­lent of the Greek God Pan)
MAR 20**
(Spring/ Vernal Equi­nox)

Alt :

The festi­val of the Goddess Eostar is cele-
brated on the full moon closest to the Spring/ Vernal Equinox.

Lady Day Lesser Low This celebration occurs when day and night are equal and light is on the ascendant.

The Maiden Goddess welcomes the green and flourishing Sun God’s embraces and conceives a child to be born in nine months at the next Winter Solstice.

Earrach, Alban Eilir, and Festival of Trees; also “Ôstarâ” and “Ēostre” (from which the holiday “Easter” is derived and both of which are incorrect-
ly applied to this equinox and quarter day) that cele-
brate the festival of the Goddess Eostar whose symbols are the egg and the hare (see Alt Date)
MAY 1*

Alt:

As a result of the change from the Julian to the Gre- gorian calendar, Beall-
tainn
came to be cele-
brated on May 15, while in Ireland Sean Bheal-
tain
(“Old May”) began the night of May 11. This festival may also be cele-
brated on the full moon nearest the mid-
point between the Spring Equinox and the Summer Solstice.

Beltane Greater High This celebration signals when the crops sown on Lady Day begin to sprout, the animals bear their young, and the people begin to get out of their houses. Activities center on fecundity and procreation, such as the maypole.

The marriage of the Maiden Goddess and the Sun God is conducted and celebrated.

One of the four “fire festivals,” bonfires are lit.

This is also the first of the three festivals of the Faerie Realm, but occurs only every seven years, when the faeries fight amongst themselves for the best ears of grain in the upcoming harvest.

May Day, Walpur-
gis Night, Lá Beal-
taine
(Ireland), Latha Beall-
tainn
(Scot-
land)
JUN 21**
(Summer Solstice)

Alt:

None

Mid-
Summer’s Eve
Lesser Low This is the longest day and shortest night of the year. From this time onwards, the days gradually grow shorter again.

The Sun God is at the peak of his power. The bounty of the earth ripens, as does the Mother Goddess with Her child.

This is a time for rest and play, a respite between the planting and harvesting of the crops.

This is also the day when the Oak King is defeated by the Holly King and the Holly King begins his six-month reign.

This is the second of the three festivals of the Faerie Realm, when faeries ride forth singing and are at their gayest.

Litha, Samradh, Alban Hefin, Aerra Litha, Mother Night, and St. John’s Eve
AUG 1*

Alt:

None

Lammas Greater High This sabbat is a celebration of the first harvest.

One of the four “fire festivals,” fire wheels were often rolled down hills to mark the declining of the Sun God’s power. Bonfires are also lit.

This is the first of the three “harvest festivals,” which incorporates the baking of a figure of the Sun God in bread, then symbolically sacrificing and eating it.

The Mother Goddess watches in both sorrow and joy as she realizes that the adult Sun God is dying, yet lives on inside Her as Her child.

Lugh-
­nassah, Lugh-
­nasadh, Lamas-
tide, August Eve, First Harvest, Bread Harvest, Gŵyl Awst (Feast of August, Wales) and Festival of First Fruits
SEP 23**
(Fall/ Autumn Equi­nox)

Alt:

None

Harvest Home Lesser Low Once again, the balance of day and night are equal with darkness on the ascen-
dant.

This sabbat is a celebration and thanks-giving of the second harvest (second of the three “harvest festivals”) of the fruits of the earth and a time of rest after hard work.

The blessings of the God/ dess for the upcoming winter months are sought.

The Sun God dies, but his power is preserved in the spirit of the fields, trapped and crystallized in the plants and animals. He returns to the womb of the Mother Goddess.

The Mother Goddess now takes on the aspect of the Crone Goddess, the old and wise one who stands at the crossroads of life and death, all-
seeing and all-knowing.

Mabon (coined by Aidan Kelly around 1970 as a reference to Mabon ap Modron, a character from Welsh myth-
ology), Second Harvest, Fruit Harvest, Wine Harvest. Feast of the Inga-
thering, Meán Fómhair, Foghar, and Alban Elfed
OCT 31*

Alt:

When the sun has reached 15 degrees Scorpio

All Hallow’s Eve Greater High This festival marks the beginning and end of the pagan year.

It is the beginning of the resting season, a time of remembrance of those who have gone before, and a time to pierce the veil between the worlds and divine what the coming year holds.

The Sun God waits in the Shining Land to be reborn and the Crone Goddess stirs the cauldron of life, death and rebirth.

The last of the three “harvest festivals,” respect is paid to ancestors, family members, elders of the faith, friends, pets and other loved ones who have died, and the spirits of the departed are invited to attend the festivities.

One of the four “fire festivals,” bonfires are lit.

This is the last of the three festivals of the Faerie Realm when faeries interact with humans, but they are at their gloom-
iest and dance with ghosts. It is also at this time that the Queen of the Faeries leads the Wild Hunt and escorts the souls of the year’s dead (and anyone living unlucky enough to encounter the Hunt) through the veil to the Shining Land (or Summer-land).

Samhain (“Sum-
mer’s End”), All Hallows, Hallow E’en, Hallo­-
ween, Last Harvest, Blood Harvest, Ancestor Night, Feast of the Dead, and Nos Calan Gaeaf
DEC 21**
(Winter Solstice)

Alt:

None

Yule Lesser Low This sabbat occurs on the longest night and shortest day, when the decreas-
ing days give way to in-
creasing light and life.

The Goddess Mother once again gives birth to the Sun God. As a newborn babe, he is the embodi-
ment of innocence and joy, and represents the returning light.

This is also the day when the Holly King is defeated by the Oak King and the Oak King begins his six-
month reign.

Some historians claim that the Yule celebration is connected to the Wild Hunt or was influenced by Saturnalia, the Roman winter festival.

Mid-
Winter’s Eve, Mid-
Winter, The Mother’s Night, Cuidle, Alban Arthan, and Winter Rite

*This date stays the same each year. **This date varies each year. Sign29

Witches Sabbats 2009 (Northern Hemisphere)

19 Jan

2009

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

FEB 2

(this date stays the same each year)

Candlemas

Greater

High

This sabbat marks the first signs of life returning to the land. The strong and growing young Sun God has been nursing at the Mother Goddess’ breast as a child; now the Goddess exchanges her robes for those of the Maiden. As one of the four “fire festivals,” candles are lit to sweep away the winter darkness.

Imbolc (“in the belly”), Oimelc (“milk of ewes”), Brigid’s Day, Brigit, Bride’s Day, Brigantia, and Lupercalia (Lupercus was the God of shepherds in Roman mythology and was associated with goats and dogs; he was identified with Faunus, the equivalent of the Greek God Pan)

“Old Style” is when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Aquari­us (FEB 4; this date varies each year)

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

MAR 20

(this date varies each year as it falls on the Spring/ Vernal Equi­nox)

Lady Day

Lesser

Low

This celebration occurs when day and night are equal and light is on the ascendant. The Maiden Goddess welcomes the grown Sun God’s embraces and conceives a child to be born in nine months at the next Winter Solstice. This festival also celebrates the marriage of the Goddess and the God (except in climates where it is too cold for outside rituals).

“Ostara” or “Eostara,” which are historically incorrect (the festi­val of the Goddess “Eostar” is separate and is best celebrated on the Spring/ Vernal Equinox full moon or esbat), Earrach Eilir, and Festival of Trees

None

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

MAY 1

(this date stays the same each year)

Beltane

Greater

High

This celebration signals the time of year when the crops sown on Lady Day begin to sprout, the animals bear their young, and the people begin to get out of their houses. For people in northern climes, the marriage of the Maiden Goddess and the Sun God is now celebrated. One of the four “fire festivals,” bonfires are lighted. Activities center around fecundity and procreation, such as the maypole.

May Day

“Old Style” is when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Taurus (MAY 4; this date varies each year)

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

JUN 21

(this date varies each year as it falls on the Summer Solstice)

Mid-Summer’s Eve

Lesser

Low

This is the longest day and shortest night of the year. From this time onwards, the days gradually grow shorter again. The Sun God is at the peak of his power. The bounty of the earth ripens, as does the Mother Goddess with Her child. This is a time for rest and play, a respite between the planting and harvesting of the crops.

Litha, Samradh, Alban Hefin, Aerra Litha, Mother Night, and St. John’s Eve

None

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

AUG 1

(this date stays the same each year)

Lammas

Greater

High

This sabbat is a celebration of the first harvest. One of the four “fire festivals,” fire wheels were often rolled down hills to mark the declining of the Sun God’s power. The Mother Goddess watches in sorrow and joy as she realizes that the Sun God is dying, and yet lives on inside Her as Her child.

Lugh­nassah, Lugh­nasadh, Lamastide, First Harvest, Bread Harvest, and Festival of First Fruits

“Old Style” is when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Leo (AUG 6; this date varies each year)

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

SEP 22

(this date varies each year as it falls on the Fall/ Autumn Equi­nox)

Harvest Home

Lesser

Low

This sabbat is a celebration and thanksgiving of the second harvest and a time of rest after hard work. Once more the balance of day and night are equal with darkness on the ascendant. The Sun God dies, but his power is preserved in the spirit of the fields, trapped and crystallized in the barley and corn. The Goddess takes on the aspect of the Crone, the old and wise one who stands at the crossroads of life and death, all-seeing and all-knowing.

Mabon, Foghar, Alban Elfed, Second Harvest, Fruit Harvest, and Wine Harvest

None

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

OCT 31

(this date stays the same each year)

All Hallow’s Eve

Greater

High

This festival marks the beginning and end of the pagan year. It is the beginning of the resting season of the land, a time of remembrance of those who have gone before, and a time to pierce the veil between the worlds and divine what the coming year holds. The Sun God waits in the Shining Land to be reborn and the Crone Goddess stirs the cauldron of life, death and rebirth.

All Hallows, Hallow E’en, Hallo­ween, Last Harvest, Blood Harvest, Ancestor Night, Feast of the Dead, Noson Calef Gaef, and Samhain

“Old Style” is when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Scorpio (NOV 6; this date varies each year)

Date

Name

Sabbat

Holiday

Celebration

Alt Names

Alt Date

DEC 21

(this date varies each year as it falls on the Winter Solstice)

Yule

Lesser

Low

This sabbat occurs on the longest night and shortest day, when the decreasing days give way to increasing light and life. The Goddess Mother once again gives birth to the new Sun God.

Mid-Winter’s Eve, Mid-Winter, Cuidle, Alban Arthan, and Winter Rite

None

Digg!

Wiccan Sabbats for 2008 (Northern Hemisphere)

13 Dec

2 FEBRUARY 2008 ~ CANDLEMAS: This “high holiday” or “greater sabbat” marks the time when the first signs of life return to the land and the Goddess changes her robes for those of Maiden. Other names for this sabbat are Imbolc (which means “in the belly”) and Oimelc (“milk of ewes”), which refer to the imminent growing and lambing season. This date stays the same each year.

Note: Some pagans celebrate Candlemas “Old Style” when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Aquarius (4 February 2008; this date varies each year).

20 MARCH 2008 ~ LADY DAY: This “low holiday” or “lesser sabbat” falls on the Spring (or Vernal) Equinox, when day and night are equal. The Great Mother Goddess, who returned to her Virgin aspect at Candlemas, welcomes the young Sun God’s embraces and conceives a child to be born in 9 months at the next Winter Solstice. This date varies each year.

Note: Some pagans refer to this sabbat as “Ostara” or “Eostara,” which is historically incorrect. The festival of the Goddess “Eostar,” whose symbols are the egg and the hare, is separate and is best celebrated on the vernal full moon or esbat.

1 MAY 2008 ~ BELTANE: Second of the two most important “high holidays” or “great sabbats,” this festival celebrates the marriage of the Goddess and the God. This pagan holiday centers on flowers, Maypoles, and greenwood frivolity. This date stays the same each year.

Note: Some pagans celebrate Beltane “Old Style” when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Taurus (4 May 2008; this date varies each year).

20 JUNE 2008 ~ MIDSUMMER’S EVE: This “low holiday” or “lesser sabbat” falls on the Summer Solstice, when the Sun is at the peak of its power. This is the longest day and shortest night of the year. From this time onwards, the days gradually grow shorter again. This date varies each year.

Note: This sabbat is also known as Litha (based on a Saxon word meaning the opposite of “Yule” but for which there is no historical evidence of its use) and St. John’s Eve (Christian name).

1 AUGUST 2008 ~ LAMMAS: This “high holiday” or “greater sabbat” marks the first harvest. This is the feast of Lugh and of the Sacrificial King, who a gingerbread man most often represents these days. This sabbat is also known as Lughnassah, Lughnasadh, and Lamastide. This date stays the same each year.

Note: Some pagans celebrate Lammas “Old Style” when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Leo (6 August 2008; this date varies each year).

22 SEPTEMBER 2008 ~ MABON: This “low holiday” or “lesser sabbat” falls on the Autumnal Equinox, when once more the balance of day and night are equal. This sabbat is also the height of the harvest and is sometimes called Harvest Home. This date varies each year.

31 OCTOBER 2008 ~ ALL HALLOW’S EVE: One of the two most important “high holidays” or “grand sabbats,” this festival marks the beginning and end of the pagan year. It is the beginning of the resting season of the land, a time of remembrance of those who have gone before, and a time to pierce the veil between the worlds and divine what the coming year holds. This sabbat is also known as All Hallows, Hallow E’en, Halloween, and Samhain (meaning “summer’s end”). Depending on where you are from, “Samhain” is pronounced “sow-in” (in Ireland), “sow-een” (in Wales), “sav-en” (in Scotland), or “sam-hane” (in the US, where Gaelic is not spoken). This date stays the same each year.

Note: Some pagans participate in non-pagan Halloween festivities on 31 October and then celebrate All Hallow’s Eve “Old Style” when the sun has reached fifteen degrees Scorpio (6 November 2008; this date varies each year).

21 DECEMBER 2008 ~ YULE: This “low holiday” or “lesser sabbat” falls on the Winter Solstice, the longest night and shortest day, when the decreasing days give way to increasing light and life. The Goddess becomes the Great Mother and once again gives birth to the new Sun King. This sabbat is also known as Midwinter’s Eve. This date varies each year.

Sources: “The Witches’ Sabbats” byMike Nichols and “2008 Equinox, Solstice & Cross-Quarter Moments Website

Digg!

Autumn In Florida

23 Nov

I took these photos in my backyard today; this is as close as I get to the changing colors of Fall:

Kat’s Mabon Projects Redux

23 Sep

As I was bringing in the mail last night, I realized that my Mabon wreath was very bottom heavy in the garland department and, with a few snips of the scissors and some quick redistribution of the bits and pieces scattered about, I think it looks much more balanced, and since balance is what we strive to achieve on Mabon, I’m much happier with the results:


My first order of the day today was to redress my personal altar, changing it from Summer to Fall and preparing it for a small Mabon ritual.


I even managed to replace the Summer placemats in the breakfast nook with a look more appropriate for the Autumn Equinox (those are my four lastest wands made by Rogue awaiting consecration and dedication on the next full moon, Wednesday, Sept 26):

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 300 other followers

%d bloggers like this: